Vigilance, active coping, and cardiovascular reactivity during social interaction in young men

Timothy W. Smith, John M. Ruiz, Bert N. Uchino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study of 72 undergraduate men examined the effects of two determinants of cardiovascular response - active coping and vigilance - on blood pressure and heart rate responses to social stressors. Observation of a future debate partner (i.e., vigilance) evoked larger increases in blood pressure than did observation of a less relevant person, apparently through the combination of increases in cardiac output and vascular resistance. Preparation and enactment of efforts to exert social influence (i.e., active coping) evoked heightened blood pressure and heart rate responses through increased cardiac contractility and output. Thus, both vigilance and active coping in social contexts increased cardiovascular reactivity, but apparently through different psychophysiological processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-392
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Active coping
  • Cardiovascular reactivity
  • Psychosocial risk
  • Vigilance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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