Using the Community Readiness Model to Assess American Indian Communities Readiness to Address Cancer Prevention and Control Programs

Teshia G. Arambula Solomon, Desiree Jones, Kelly Laurila, Jamie Ritchey, Felina M. Cordova-Marks, Amanda Urbina Hunter, Berna Villanueva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cancer disparities continue among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations while they have decreased among other racial and ethnic groups. No studies were found that utilized the Community Readiness Model (CRM) to ascertain the readiness of Tribal and American Indian organizations to participate in cancer research and cancer prevention and control initiatives. The Partnership for Native American Cancer Prevention conducted an assessment of the status of American Indian communities’ readiness to implement activities for prevention, early detection, and treatment to improve AI/AN cancer rates. The assessment was a component of the Community Outreach Core of the grant. Thirty-four key Informants participated in the interview process. The Community Readiness Assessment (CRA) provided a baseline assessment of community partners’ readiness to participate in cancer research and programming. Despite years of cancer intervention programs, the communities were classified as being in the early stages of readiness [1–5] of the nine-stage model. Additionally, findings showed low levels of awareness of previous or ongoing cancer research. The findings in prevention and control efforts indicated a need for technical assistance and funding to support community projects in prevention and control. This supported the implementation of a community grants initiative. They also indicated that communities were not ready to conduct research, despite ongoing cancer related research in at least two communities. Communication tools and social media methods and messages were developed to increase awareness of cancer as a health concern and cancer research in the community. The CRM informed these and other engagement activities to meet the appropriate stage of readiness for each Tribe/community, and to build their capacity to participate in cancer research and programming activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • American Indian and Alaska Native
  • Cancer prevention
  • Community readiness
  • Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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