Using Active Learning Strategies Linked to CBPR Principles in a Semester-Long Class Project to Teach Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health

Kerstin M. Reinschmidt, Paula Maez, Joseph E. Iuliano, Brittany M. Nigon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of active learning strategies to engage students in public health education has shown to be effective in promoting meaningful learning experiences. These educational approaches include inquiry- or problem-based, and group-based learning that allow for deeper understanding and internalization of the content material. This type of active learning can extend into the community by applying community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles. Using CBPR can engage both the community and the students on a project, thus benefiting all parties involved. This article describes the components of a class project that linked the active learning strategies of inquiry and group-based learning to CBPR principles as an innovative teaching approach in public health. The design and implementation of the class project is conceptualized in four activity types: (1) engaging the community, (2) working with students, (3) conducting behind the scenes work, and (4) bringing the students and the community together. The project demonstrates the benefits of using CBPR principles in conjunction with active learning principles. It also provides recommendations to public health instructors in higher education, which include the requirements of instructors’ established relationship with the community, commitment to project coordination, flexibility regarding project implementation and class time, and university support for sustaining innovative teaching efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-44
Number of pages9
JournalPedagogy in Health Promotion
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • active learning strategies
  • community-based participatory research
  • public health
  • qualitative research methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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