Use of sleeping trees by black and white colobus monkeys (Colobus guereza) in the Kakamega Forest, Kenya

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41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Groups of black and white colobus monkeys, or guerezas (Colobus guereza), observed in the Kakamega Forest, Kenya, had weak fidelity for sleeping sites. Groups often slept in trees near commonly used food sources, which might reduce the time and energetic costs of travel. Although the home range of each group overlapped with four to seven others, groups seemed to avoid sleeping near other groups, which would give them immediate and exclusive access to nearby food sources in the morning. The number of times a species of tree was slept in was positively correlated with its density. This may have occurred because so many suitable sites were available that proximity to feeding trees could be obtained whether or not groups slept in the feeding trees. Groups slept in tall trees, which provide stable sleeping sites and which may provide protection from both aerial and ground predators. Groups were more tightly clustered on nights with greater visibility, which might reduce the risk of predation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-290
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Primatology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Black and white colobus
  • Colobus guereza
  • Sleeping trees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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