Unexpected absence of aphasia following left temporal hemorrhage: a case study with functional neuroimaging to characterize the nature of atypical language localization

Sarah M. Schneck, Jillian L. Entrup, Melissa C. Duff, Stephen M. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Unexpected absence of aphasia after left-hemisphere perisylvian damage is often assumed to reflect right-hemisphere language lateralization, but other potential explanations include bilateral language representation, or sparing of critical left-hemisphere regions due to individual variability. We describe the case of a left-handed gentleman who presented with no aphasia after a left temporal hemorrhage. We used functional neuroimaging to determine how his language network had been spared. In this case, we observed unequivocal right-hemisphere lateralization of language function, explaining his lack of aphasia. We discuss the variability of language organization and highlight outstanding questions about the implications of damage in different scenarios.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalNeurocase
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • atypical language organization
  • bilateral language
  • fMRI
  • right-lateralized language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

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