Travelling the route from designation to local action: The case of the underground railroad settlement in Buxton, Ontario, Canada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Canada's Buxton Settlement National Historic Site is a striking illustration of the multi-faceted conservation of a cultural landscape, from federal designation through to local action. Buxton is designated as a 'continuing landscape' distinguished by its establishment in 1849 as a 9,000 acre (3,600 ha)1 terminus for black fugitives travelling north along the so-called Underground Railroad, escaping the tyranny of slavery in the USA. A social experiment, in the form of a block farming settlement, waited for them at the end of their journeys. Over the intervening years inevitable shifts in agricultural practice and property ownership have transformed this rather ordinary but strongly evocative heritage resource. This is a case common to many other significant cultural landscapesthe management of the inevitable evolution that comes with a landscape that continues. This agricultural landscape confronts many of the challenges that are the focus of heritage studies today: how to give local people a voice while coordinating conservation across multiple scales of government policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-388
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Heritage Studies
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Canada
  • Conservation policy
  • Cultural landscapes
  • Local action
  • Underground railroad

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Conservation
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Museology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Travelling the route from designation to local action: The case of the underground railroad settlement in Buxton, Ontario, Canada'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this