Traumatic cervical spine subarachnoid hemorrhage with hematoma and cord compression presenting as Brown-Séϋard syndrome: illustrative case

Pereira Bernardo de Andrada, Benjamen M. Meyer, Angelica Alvarez Reyes, Jose Manuel Orenday-Barraza, Leonardo B. Brasiliense, R. John Hurlbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND Spinal hematomas are a rare entity with broad etiologies, which stem from idiopathic, tumor-related, and vascular malformation etiologies. Less common causes include traumatic blunt nonpenetrating spinal hematomas with very few cases being reported. In the present manuscript presents a case report and review of the literature of a rare traumatic entity of a cervical subarachnoid hematoma in association with Brown-S equard syndrome in a patient on anticoagulants. Searches were performed on PubMed and Embase for specific terms related. OBSERVATIONS A well-documented case of an 83-year-old female taking anticoagulants with traumatic cervical subarachnoid hematoma presenting as Brown-S equard syndrome was reported. Six similar cases were identified, scrutinized, and analyzed in the literature review. LESSONS Traumatic blunt nonpenetrating cervical spine subarachnoid hematomas are a rare entity that can happen more specifically in anticoagulant users and in patients with arthritic changes and stenosis of the spinal canal. Rapid neurological deterioration and severe disability warrant early aggressive surgical treatment. This report has the intention to record this case in the medical literature for registry purposes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberCASE22431
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons
Volume4
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Brown-Sequard
  • cervical
  • hematoma
  • laminectomy
  • subarachnoid
  • traumatic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

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