The use of multi-element aerosol particles for determining temporal variations in temperature and electron density in laser-induced plasmas in support of quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

Michael E. Asgill, Sebastian Groh, Kay Niemax, David W. Hahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis operates on the assumption that the sample is completely dissociated and diffused within the highly energetic plasma on time-scales of analyte analysis, resulting in analyte emission ideally at the bulk plasma temperature and a signal that is linear with analyte mass concentration. However, recent studies focusing on aerosol analysis have found the heat and mass diffusion rates within laser-induced plasmas to be finite, resulting in particle-rich, locally perturbed areas within the hot bulk plasma. The goal of this study is to observe any related plasma differences, by calculating the bulk and local (i.e. analyte rich regions) plasma temperatures and electron density, to better understand the time frame of equilibrium between the local and bulk plasma properties. This study also seeks to determine whether the presence of large quantities of a matrix element can significantly alter the local plasma conditions, thereby generating matrix effects. We report the temporal profiles of particle-derived species, adding additional insight into the effect of local perturbation of plasma properties, with the conclusion that significant plasma residence (tens of microseconds) is necessary to minimize such effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4899
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalSpectrochimica Acta - Part B Atomic Spectroscopy
Volume109
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 17 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aerosol analysis
  • Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy
  • LIBS
  • Matrix effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation
  • Spectroscopy

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