The Stratigraphy and Chronology of Point of Pines Pueblo: Basic Facts that Underlie Complex Inferences Regarding Interactions Between Locals and Immigrants

Patrick D. Lyons, Don L. Burgess, Virginia W. Johns, Marilyn M. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Point of Pines Pueblo has long been central to discussions about ancient migrations and interactions between locals and immigrants in the U.S. Southwest. However, a lack of systematic analyses of collections from the site and a dearth of published data about them have left generations of researchers in the position of having to make assumptions about social processes that unfolded in the Point of Pines region. Here, we present the results of new analyses establishing basic facts that will eventually allow a more accurate reconstruction of social dynamics at Point of Pines Pueblo. We focus on stratigraphy, ceramics, dendrochronological data, and wall bonding/abutment information. We conclude that most of the pitstructures at the site date to the thirteenth century, the earliest above-ground architecture was built during the late 1200s, the early pueblo architecture was constructed by immigrants, and the Kayenta immigrant occupation involved considerable planning and coordinated action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalKIVA
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Kayenta
  • Maverick Mountain Series
  • Maverick Mountain phase
  • Point of Pines
  • architecture
  • ceramics
  • dendrochronology
  • migration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Archaeology

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