The reality of “food porn”: Larger brain responses to food-related cues than to erotic images predict cue-induced eating

Francesco Versace, David W. Frank, Elise M. Stevens, Menton M. Deweese, Michele Guindani, Susan M. Schembre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

While some individuals can defy the lure of temptation, many others find appetizing food irresistible. The goal of this study was to investigate the neuropsychological mechanisms that increase individuals' vulnerability to cue-induced eating. Using ERPs, a direct measure of brain activity, we showed that individuals with larger late positive potentials in response to food-related cues than to erotic images are more susceptible to cue-induced eating and, in the presence of a palatable food option, eat more than twice as much as individuals with the opposite brain reactivity profile. By highlighting the presence of individual brain reactivity profiles associated with susceptibility to cue-induced eating, these findings contribute to the understanding of the neurobiological basis of vulnerability to obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13309
JournalPSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ERPs
  • cue reactivity
  • endophenotypes
  • incentive salience
  • late positive potential (LPP)
  • sign tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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