The potential roles of blood–brain barrier and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier in maintaining brain manganese homeostasis

Shannon Morgan McCabe, Ningning Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Manganese (Mn) is a trace nutrient necessary for life but becomes neurotoxic at high concentrations in the brain. The brain is a “privileged” organ that is separated from systemic blood circulation mainly by two barriers. Endothelial cells within the brain form tight junctions and act as the blood–brain barrier (BBB), which physically separates circulating blood from the brain parenchyma. Between the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is the choroid plexus (CP), which is a tissue that acts as the blood–CSF barrier (BCB). Pharmaceuticals, proteins, and metals in the systemic circulation are unable to reach the brain and spinal cord unless transported through either of the two brain barriers. The BBB and the BCB consist of tightly connected cells that fulfill the critical role of neuroprotection and control the exchange of materials between the brain environment and blood circulation. Many recent publications provide insights into Mn transport in vivo or in cell models. In this review, we will focus on the current research regarding Mn metabolism in the brain and discuss the potential roles of the BBB and BCB in maintaining brain Mn homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1833
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Blood–brain barrier
  • Blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier
  • Choroid plexus
  • Manganese

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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