The impacts of demand variability on distribution system water quality

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A stochastic water demand generator (PRPsym) and a distribution system network solver (EPANET) were linked to analyze the impact of demand variability on water quality simulations at three temporal demand aggregations (1-hour, 10-minute, and 1-minute). The water quality simulation was modeled as a short-duration conservative chemical injection. Results showed that decreasing temporal demand aggregation increased chemical concentration variability and, in some cases, changed the underlying transport characteristics. The results were also interpreted within a risk assessment framework assuming a toxic chemical species, which illustrated that the impacts of temporal demand aggregation were more evident for nodes where the underlying hydraulic path had been altered. These underlying changes in hydraulic transport were typically observed at the edges of the system rather than main trunk lines, which suggest that there may be portions of a distribution system where typical deterministic modeling assumptions may not adequately represent localized water quality conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIntegrating Water Systems - Proceedings of the 10th International on Computing and Control for the Water Industry, CCWI 2009
Pages459-463
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event10th International Conference on Computing and Control for the Water Industry: Integrating Water Systems, CCWI 2009 - Sheffield, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 1 2009Sep 3 2009

Publication series

NameIntegrating Water Systems - Proceedings of the 10th International on Computing and Control for the Water Industry, CCWI 2009

Conference

Conference10th International Conference on Computing and Control for the Water Industry: Integrating Water Systems, CCWI 2009
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CitySheffield
Period9/1/099/3/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Water Science and Technology

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