The impact of high-intensity interval exercise training on NK-cell function and circulating myokines for breast cancer prevention among women at high risk for breast cancer

Adriana M. Coletta, Nadia H. Agha, Forrest L. Baker, Grace M. Niemiro, Preteesh L. Mylabathula, Abenaa M. Brewster, Therese B. Bevers, Enrique Fuentes-Mattei, Karen Basen-Engquist, Susan C. Gilchrist, Richard J. Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Preclinical evidence suggests that natural killer cell (NK-cell) function and myokines facilitate the protective effects of exercise for breast cancer prevention. Since higher-intensity exercise acutely promotes greater mobilization and larger changes in NK-cell cytotoxicity than lower-intensity, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) might offer increased immune protection compared to moderate-intensity continuous-training (MICT). This study compared a 12-week HIIT program to a 12-week MICT program and usual care on changes in resting NK-cell function and circulating myokines among women at high risk for breast cancer. Methods: Thirty-three women were randomized to HIIT, MICT, or usual care, for a supervised exercise intervention. Blood was collected at baseline and end-of-study. The cytotoxic activity of CD3−/CD56+ NK-cells against the K562 target cell line in vitro was determined by flow cytometry. Circulating myokines (IL-15, IL-6, irisin, OSM, osteonectin, IL-7) were assessed with luminex multiplex assays and ELISA. One-way ANOVA and paired sample t-tests assessed between- and within-group differences, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficients determined relationships between baseline fitness and change variables. Results: Significant differences were not observed between groups for change in NK-cell function or circulating myokines (p > 0.05). Significant correlations were only observed for baseline peak aerobic capacity (ml/kg/min) and change in NK-cell-specific lysis (r = − 0.43, p = 0.02) and hemacytotoxicity for the total sample (r = − 0.46, p = 0.01). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that exercise intensity may not significantly impact change in resting NK-cell function and circulating myokines among women at high risk for breast cancer. Structured exercise training may have a larger impact on NK-cell function in those with lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Clinical trial registration: NCT02923401; Registered on October 4, 2016.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-416
Number of pages10
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume187
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast cancer prevention
  • Cytokines
  • Exercise immunology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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