The formation of large-scale collaborative resource management institutions: Clarifying the roles of stakeholders, science, and institutions

Tanya Heikkila, Andrea K. Gerlak

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

177 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article explores the emergence of collaborative institutional arrangements for managing natural resources in large-scale and complex resource settings, among numerous political jurisdictions and stakeholders. It examines four regional institutions in the United States: the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Chesapeake Bay Program, the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, and the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. While a wealth of literature has looked at the emergence of smaller-scale resource management institutions, and some literature has begun to look at the characteristics and successes of these regional institutions, theory is lacking to explain the formation of these regional institutions. We first introduce three relevant streams of literature - on common pool resources management, on policy entrepreneurs and social capital, and on science and information in policy change - to frame our analysis. The comparisons of the cases point to the importance of integrating key insights from the literature for understanding the formation of collaborative resource governance. We emphasize how science, leadership, and prior organizational experience interact in facilitating institutional change, particularly in the process of raising awareness about resource management problems. In tracing the formation of these institutions, we also identify how external institutional triggers can help spur collaborative governance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-612
Number of pages30
JournalPolicy Studies Journal
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Keywords

  • CALFED Bay-Delta Program
  • Chesapeake Bay Program
  • Collaborative environmental governance
  • Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan
  • Institutional change
  • Northwest Power and Conservation Council
  • Policy entrepreneurs
  • Scientific information

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The formation of large-scale collaborative resource management institutions: Clarifying the roles of stakeholders, science, and institutions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this