The association between perceived stress, acculturation, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Mexican-origin adults in Southern Arizona

Adriana Maldonado, Edgar A. Villavicencio, Rosa M. Vogel, Thaddeus W. Pace, John M. Ruiz, Naim Alkhouri, David O. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although available evidence indicates that Mexican-origin (MO) adults experience unique stressful life events, little is known about how stress may influence risk for developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) for this high-risk group. This study investigated the association between perceived stress and NAFLD and explored how this relationship varied by acculturation levels. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 307 MO adults from a community-based sample in the U.S-Mexico Southern Arizona border region completed self-reported measures of perceived stress and acculturation. NAFLD was identified as having a continuous attenuation parameter (CAP) score of ≥ 288 dB/m determined by FibroScan®. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for NAFLD. The prevalence of NAFLD was 50 % (n = 155). Overall, perceived stress was high (Mean = 15.9) for the total sample. There were no differences by NAFLD status (No NAFLD: Mean = 16.6; NAFLD: Mean = 15.3; p = 0.11). Neither perceived stress nor acculturation were associated with NAFLD status. However, the association between perceived stress and NAFLD was moderated by acculturation levels. Specifically with each point increase in perceived stress, the odds of having NAFLD were 5.5 % higher for MO adults with an Anglo orientation and 1.2 % higher for bicultural MO adults. In contrast, the odds of NAFLD for MO adults with a Mexican cultural orientation were 9.3 % lower with each point increase in perceived stress. In conclusion, results highlight the need for additional efforts to fully understand the pathways through which stress and acculturation may influence the prevalence of NAFLD in MO adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102147
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume32
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Liver disease
  • Mexican-origin adults
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Perceived stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Informatics

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