Terrestrial stress analogs for spaceflight associated immune system dysregulation

Brian Crucian, Richard J. Simpson, Satish Mehta, Raymond Stowe, Alexander Chouker, Shen An Hwang, Jeffrey K. Actor, Alex P. Salam, Duane Pierson, Clarence Sams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent data indicates that dysregulation of the immune system occurs and persists during spaceflight. Impairment of immunity, especially in conjunction with elevated radiation exposure and limited clinical care, may increase certain health risks during exploration-class deep space missions (i.e. to an asteroid or Mars). Research must thoroughly characterize immune dysregulation in astronauts to enable development of a monitoring strategy and validate any necessary countermeasures. Although the International Space Station affords an excellent platform for on-orbit research, access may be constrained by technical, logistical vehicle or funding limitations. Therefore, terrestrial spaceflight analogs will continue to serve as lower cost, easier access platforms to enable basic human physiology studies. Analog work can triage potential in-flight experiments and thus result in more focused on-orbit studies, enhancing overall research efficiency. Terrestrial space analogs generally replicate some of the physiological or psychological stress responses associated with spaceflight. These include the use of human test subjects in a laboratory setting (i.e. exercise, bed rest, confinement, circadian misalignment) and human remote deployment analogs (Antarctica winterover, undersea, etc.) that incorporate confinement, isolation, extreme environment, physiological mission stress and disrupted circadian rhythms. While bed rest has been used to examine the effects of physical deconditioning, radiation and microgravity may only be simulated in animal or microgravity cell culture (clinorotation) analogs. This article will characterize the array of terrestrial analogs for spaceflight immune dysregulation, the current evidence base for each, and interpret the analog catalog in the context of acute and chronic stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-32
Number of pages10
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Exercise
  • Immunity
  • Spaceflight
  • Stress
  • T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Terrestrial stress analogs for spaceflight associated immune system dysregulation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this