Specific depressive symptoms predict remission to aripiprazole augmentation in late-life treatment resistant depression

Marie Anne Gebara, Elizabeth A. DiNapoli, John Kasckow, Jordan F. Karp, Daniel M. Blumberger, Eric J. Lenze, Benoit H. Mulsant, Charles F. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To identify which specific depressive symptoms predict remission to aripiprazole augmentation in late-life treatment resistant depression. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of data from a late-life treatment resistant depression trial examining the safety and efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation. Participants aged 60 and above were randomized to aripiprazole augmentation (N = 91) versus placebo (N = 90). The main outcome was depression remission. Clinical predictors included individual Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) item scores categorized as symptomatic (scores >2) or nonsymptomatic (scores ≤2). Results: Three MADRS items predicted depression remission with aripiprazole augmentation: symptomatic scores on sleep disturbance and nonsymptomatic scores on apparent sadness and inability to feel. The 2-way and 3-way interaction terms of these MADRS items were not significant predictors of remission; therefore, the models' ability to predict remission was not improved by combining the significant MADRS items. Conclusions: The identification of specific depressive symptoms, which can be clinically assessed, can be used to inform treatment decisions. Older adults with treatment resistant depression that present with sleep disturbances, lack of apparent sadness, or lack of inability to feel should be considered for aripiprazole augmentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e330-e335
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aging
  • aripiprazole
  • depression
  • MADRS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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