Social motivation and behavior in first-episode psychosis: Unique contributions to social quality of life and social functioning

Aubrey M. Moe, David M. Weiss, Jacob G. Pine, Heather M. Wastler, Nicholas J.K. Breitborde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social functioning is diminished among people early in the course of psychotic illnesses, and is likely influenced by the negative symptoms that accompany these disorders, including changes in motivation and experience of pleasure. Though social impairments have a deleterious impact on functioning, socialization is a multifaceted behavior and little is known about how the various aspects may influence social functioning and social quality of life among people with first-episode psychosis. In the present study, we investigated the associations of specific aspects of social motivation and behavior with social functioning and social quality of life in a group of 54 young people (aged 15 to 35) with first-episode psychosis. Though different aspects of social motivation and behavior correlated positively with one another, social motivation for peer interactions was uniquely associated with social functioning and social quality of life – including when a broad measure of negative symptoms was considered within the same model. When these same associations were examined longitudinally, social motivation for peer interactions again emerged as a unique predictor of change in social functioning over 6 months. Our results suggest that the unique contribution of aspects of social motivation has implications for treatment, including the importance of developmentally-informed interventions to improve peer socialization in youth and young adults with psychosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-447
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume144
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • First-episode psychosis
  • Social functioning
  • Social motivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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