Sleep continuity, timing, quality, and disorder are associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among college students

Andrew S. Tubbs, Krishna Taneja, Sadia B. Ghani, Michael R. Nadorff, Christopher W. Drapeau, Jordan Karp, Fabian Fernandez, Michael L. Perlis, Michael A. Grandner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate sleep continuity, timing, quality, and disorder in relation to suicidal ideation and attempts among college students. Participants: Eight hundred eighty-five undergraduates aged 18–25 in the southwestern United States. Methods: Participants completed questionnaires on sleep, suicide risk, mental health, and substance use. Differences in sleep variables were compared by lifetime and recent suicidal ideation and suicide attempts using covariate-adjusted and stepwise regression models. Results: A total of 363 (40.1%) individuals reported lifetime suicidal ideation, of whom 172 (19.4%) reported suicidal ideation in the last 3 months and 97 (26.7%) had attempted suicide in their lifetime. Sleep disturbances were prevalent among those with lifetime suicidal ideation or a lifetime suicide attempt. Insomnia was identified as the best predictor of recent suicidal ideation, but this relationship did not survive adjustment for covariates. Conclusions: Sleep continuity, quality, and sleep disorders are broadly associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviors among college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Chronotype
  • insomnia
  • nightmares
  • sleep continuity
  • suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sleep continuity, timing, quality, and disorder are associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among college students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this