Seasonal Flight Pattern of the Kissing Bugs Triatoma rubida and T. protracta (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) in Southern Arizona, United States

Justin O. Schmidt, Mary L. Miller, Stephen A. Klotz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The two most common kissing bugs, Triatoma rubida and T. protracta, in the Sonoran Desert around Tucson, Arizona are hematophagous vectors of Chagas disease and can induce potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. They were surveyed during their summer dispersal flight period to determine which environmental factors are correlated with flight activity. The two most important factors governing flights of T. rubida were temperatures in the range of 26–35 C and wind speeds below 14 km/h (9 miles/h). Flights were reduced below or above those temperatures, or when wind speeds exceeding 14km/h. Relative humidity and presence or absence of moonshine appeared unimportant. During their dispersal flight periods of May through July and, especially, between the peak of the flight season, 20 June to 5 July, biologists seeking to collect bugs and homeowners wishing to exclude these biting bugs from entering their homes should be most attentive during evenings of average temperature and low wind speed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number265
JournalInsects
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Chagas disease
  • Dispersal
  • Moon light
  • Sonoran Desert
  • Trypanosoma cruzi

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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