School Mental Health Professionals’ Knowledge of Stereotypes and Implicit Bias Toward Black and Latinx Youths

Freda F. Liu, Erin McRee, Jessica Coifman, Jeff Stone, Calvin K. Lai, Chia Li Yu, Aaron R. Lyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinician bias is a contributor to health care inequities, but research on racial-ethnic bias among mental health professionals, especially toward minoritized youths, is limited. This column describes two studies involving mental health clinicians in schools, where most youths access mental health services. Study 1 used a mixed-methods approach to identify stereotypes about Black and Latinx youths salient to clinicians (e.g., academic failure; anger and aggression). In study 2, the authors developed four Implicit Association Tests to assess clinicians’ implicit prejudice and stereotyping of Black and Latinx youths and found pro-White and anti-Black/Latinx bias at levels similar to those of other health care providers and the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1308-1311
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume73
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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