Relationship between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes and virus load after recent HIV-1 seroconversion

Elizabeth Connick, Rick L. Schlichtemeier, Kristina M. Purner, Kristina M. Schneider, Deborah M. Anderson, Samantha MaWhinney, T. B. Campbell, D. R. Kuritzkes, John M. Douglas, Franklyn N. Judson, Robert T. Schooley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific memory, or precursor, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in 14 subjects who had recently experienced seroconversion were evaluated with respect to virus set point, defined as plasma HIV-1 RNA level 6 months after seroconversion. Env-, Gag-, Pol-, and Nef-specific precursor CTL were detected in 51Cr-release assays, using antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effectors and B cell lines infected with HIV-1-vaccinia recombinants as targets. All subjects tested had precursor CTL specific to at least 2 HIV-1 antigens. Detection of Env-specific precursor CTL was associated with a high set point (P = 0221). The number of antigens recognized tended to be greater in subjects with higher set points (p = .45621; P = .1171). Gag-specific precursor CTL frequency correlated inversely with set point (p = -.8478; P = .0003). Two heterozygotes for a 32-bp deletion in CCR5 had the lowest set points (P = .0220) and highest Gag precursor CTL frequencies (P = .0128). These data suggest that host factors that restrict viral replication may be important determinants of the level of HIV-1-specific precursor CTL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1465-1469
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume184
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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