Recruitment and Retention Strategies Used in Dietary Randomized Controlled Interventions with Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review

Samantha J. Werts, Sarah A. Lavelle, Tracy E. Crane, Cynthia A. Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this review was to systematically evaluate the quality of reporting of recruitment and retention methods in diet-related intervention trials among cancer survivors. Methods: A systematic search of five databases in Spring 2023 identified dietary intervention randomized controlled trials with a minimum of 50 cancer survivors, an intervention of at least eight weeks, and at least six months of study duration. Outcomes investigated include methodologic description and reporting of recruitment and retention rates. Results: Seventeen trials met inclusion criteria. Recruitment methods included cancer registry and clinician referral, hospital records, flyers, and media campaigns, and were reported in 88.2% of studies. Eleven of 17 studies (64.7%) met a priori recruitment goals. Eleven studies identified an a priori retention goal and seven met the goal. Retention goals were met more often for studies of less than one year (71.4%) versus greater than one year (50%), and for studies with remote or hybrid delivery (66.7%) versus only in-person delivery (50%). Conclusions: Recruitment goals and methods are frequently reported; reporting of retention methods and goals is limited. Efforts are needed to improve reporting of retention methods and rates to inform best practices and enhance the rigor of future dietary intervention trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4366
JournalCancers
Volume15
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2023

Keywords

  • attrition
  • cancer survivors
  • diet
  • enrollment
  • reliability
  • validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Recruitment and Retention Strategies Used in Dietary Randomized Controlled Interventions with Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this