Radiation-induced changes in energy metabolism result in mitochondrial dysfunction in salivary glands

Lauren G. Buss, Brenna A. Rheinheimer, Kirsten H. Limesand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Salivary glands are indirectly damaged during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, resulting in acute and chronic hyposalivation. Current treatments for radiation-induced hyposalivation do not permanently restore function to the gland; therefore, more mechanistic understanding of the damage response is needed to identify therapeutic targets for lasting restoration. Energy metabolism reprogramming has been observed in cancer and wound healing models to provide necessary fuel for cell proliferation; however, there is limited understanding of alterations in energy metabolism reprogramming in tissues that fail to heal. We measured extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates, assessed mitochondrial DNA copy number, and tested fuel dependency of irradiated primary salivary acinar cells. Radiation treatment leads to increases in glycolytic flux, oxidative phosphorylation, and ATP production rate at acute and intermediate time points. In contrast, at chronic radiation time points there is a significant decrease in glycolytic flux, oxidative phosphorylation, and ATP production rate. Irradiated salivary glands exhibit significant decreases in spare respiratory capacity and increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number at days 5 and 30 post-treatment, suggesting a mitochondrial dysfunction phenotype. These results elucidate kinetic changes in energy metabolism reprogramming of irradiated salivary glands that may underscore the chronic loss of function phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number845
JournalScientific reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Radiation-induced changes in energy metabolism result in mitochondrial dysfunction in salivary glands'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this