Racial and ethnic differences in the relationship between antenatal stressful life events and postpartum depression among women in the United States: does provider communication on perinatal depression minimize the risk?

Soumyadeep Mukherjee, Kristopher Fennie, Stefany Coxe, Purnima Madhivanan, Mary Jo Trepka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Multi-state population-based studies exploring the racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence and correlates of postpartum depression (PPD), which affects 10–20% of women in the US, are rare. The aim of this study was to examine the racial/ethnic disparities in the relationship between antenatal stressful life events and PPD among US women and to explore whether antenatal health care provider communication on perinatal depression was associated with a lower risk. Methods: Data from the 2009–2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) were used. For each racial/ethnic group, the distribution of PPD was compared according to different levels of the stressors and socio-demographic, pre-pregnancy, antenatal, delivery, and neonatal characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed with PPD as the outcome and all variables that were significant in bivariate analyses as predictors. Results: Eleven percent of 87,565 women met the criteria for PPD with the prevalence ranging from 7.9% among Asian/Pacific Islanders to 14% among American Indian/Alaska Natives. Irrespective of race/ethnicity, having many bills to pay and having more than usual arguments with husband/partner were risk factors for PPD. Among non-Hispanic black (NHB) women, having a husband/partner who did not want the pregnancy was associated with PPD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14, 1.90), and among non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), drug/drinking problems of someone close was associated with PPD (aOR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.21, 1.55). Provider communication was inversely associated with PPD among NHWs (aOR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.85) and NHBs (aOR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.93). Conclusion: The protective effect of provider communication on PPD suggests the benefit of a simple conversation about perinatal depression during antenatal care. Furthermore, risk factors for PPD varied by race/ethnicity suggesting that these vulnerabilities should be taken into consideration in identifying women at-risk for PPD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)542-565
Number of pages24
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • PRAMS
  • Racial and ethnic
  • postpartum depression
  • provider communication
  • stressful life events

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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