Psychological resilience and hardiness as protective factors in the relationship between depression/anxiety and well-being: Exploratory and confirmatory evidence

Anne E. Chuning, Michelle R. Durham, William D.S. Killgore, Ryan Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous research shows depression and anxiety are negatively correlated with subjective well-being. Additionally, there is evidence psychological resilience positively influences well-being. The present study explored whether the relationship between depression/anxiety and subjective well-being might also be moderated by aspects of psychological resilience – such that depression and anxiety do not reduce well-being to the same extent in individuals high in psychological resilience traits. Participants from an exploratory sample (N = 236, Mage = 23.49) and confirmatory sample (N = 196, Mage = 24.99) completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety, well-being, resilience, and hardiness (i.e., CDRISC and DRS-15). As expected, results showed strong negative correlations between anxiety/depression and both well-being and resilience/hardiness, as well as positive correlations between well-being and resilience/hardiness. A significant interaction was also present between both resilience/hardiness and depression/anxiety in predicting well-being in the first sample. Results partially replicated in the confirmatory sample (i.e., for hardiness but not resilience). These findings add to prior work by highlighting hardiness (as measured by the DRS-15), one aspect of psychological resilience, as an important protective factor in mental health. Namely, results suggest individuals with symptoms of affective disorders may remain capable of living subjectively fulfilling lives if they possess traits of psychological resilience such as hardiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number112664
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume225
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2024

Keywords

  • Flourishing
  • Hardiness
  • Mental health
  • Resilience
  • Subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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