Presidential debate learning as a gateway to opinion articulation, communication intentions, and information seeking

Freddie J. Jennings, Josh C. Bramlett, Kate Kenski, Isabel I. Villanueva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Presidential debates are a source of political learning for those who watch them. This study examines how learning from debates cultivates intentions for political engagement by increasing individuals’ opinion articulation. Using data from a study that involved participants (N = 543) who watched a nine-minute video from the first 2020 general election presidential debate in which the presidential candidates answered questions about the economy, we find that people who learned most from this segment had increased ability to articulate their opinions about the candidates. Opinion articulation, in turn, was associated with people’s intentions to discuss the economy with others and to engage in candidate advocacy. Ultimately, these effects were associated with increased intentions to seek additional information about the economy. The direct and indirect effects of political learning are explained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-252
Number of pages17
JournalArgumentation and Advocacy
Volume57
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Presidential debate
  • information seeking
  • opinion articulation
  • political discussion
  • political learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Presidential debate learning as a gateway to opinion articulation, communication intentions, and information seeking'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this