Parental protective influences and gender-specific increases in adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems

Laura V. Scaramella, Rand D. Conger, Ronald L. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

117 Scopus citations

Abstract

This investigation examined gender differences in growth rates of externalizing and internalizing problems over a 5-year period, from early to late adolescence. It also examined the role of parental warmth, low hostility, and child management practices in inhibiting the growth trajectories of these developmental problems. Specifically, parenting was hypothesized to exhibit either a compensatory or buffering effect on age-related increases in adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems. Data were collected annually from 319 mothers, fathers, and their adolescent children (168 girls, 151 boys). The results demonstrated significant gender differences in growth trajectories of externalizing and internalizing problems. Both the compensatory and buffering hypotheses were supported with regard to externalizing problems. A compensatory effect of parenting practices on levels of internalizing problems also was demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-141
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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