One Bite, Two Patients: Disparate Clinical Courses Following Simultaneous Crotalus oreganus abyssus Envenomation

Craig William Heise, Cody Cunningham, Anne Michelle Ruha, Ayrn D. O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A number of crotaline species have been associated with neurotoxic envenomation in North America. One clinical sign that can occur is myokymia: fine, involuntary, wave-like muscle movements occurring at regular intervals. We report an unusual scenario in which a single snakebite resulted in simultaneous envenomation of 2 patients. Both developed myokymia, with 1 having respiratory compromise. One patient also developed a hypersensitivity reaction to antivenom. Envenomation by the Grand Canyon rattlesnake, Crotalus oreganus abyssus, can produce significant neurotoxicity and resultant respiratory compromise. Antivenom may be helpful but can produce hypersensitivity reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-357
Number of pages4
JournalWilderness and Environmental Medicine
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Grand Canyon rattlesnake
  • antivenom
  • myokymia
  • selfie

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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