MWIR persistent surveillance performance for human and vehicle backtracking as a function of ground sample distance and revisit rate

R. Driggers, S. Aghera, P. Richardson, B. Miller, J. Doe, A. Robinson, K. Krapels, S. Murrill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Real MWIR Persistent Surveillance (PS) data was taken with a single human walking from a known point to different tents in the PS sensor field of view. The spatial resolution (ground sample distance) and revisit rate was varied from 0.5 to 2 meters and 1/8th to 4 Hz, respectively. A perception experiment was conducted where the observer was tasked to track the human to the terminal (end of route) tent. The probability of track is provided as a function of ground sample distance and revisit rate. These results can help determine PS design requirements for tracking and back-tracking humans on the ground. This paper begins with a summary of two previous simulation experiments: one for human tracking and one for vehicle tracking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInfrared Imaging Systems
Subtitle of host publicationDesign, Analysis, Modeling, and Testing XIX
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventInfrared Imaging Systems: Design, Analysis, Modeling, and Testing XIX - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Mar 18 2008Mar 19 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume6941
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceInfrared Imaging Systems: Design, Analysis, Modeling, and Testing XIX
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period3/18/083/19/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'MWIR persistent surveillance performance for human and vehicle backtracking as a function of ground sample distance and revisit rate'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this