Metamaterial apertures for coherent computational imaging on the physical layer

Guy Lipworth, Alex Mrozack, John Hunt, Daniel L. Marks, Tom Driscoll, David Brady, David R. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

166 Scopus citations

Abstract

We introduce the concept of a metamaterial aperture, in which an underlying reference mode interacts with a designed metamaterial surface to produce a series of complex field patterns. The resonant frequencies of the metamaterial elements are randomly distributed over a large bandwidth (18-26 GHz), such that the aperture produces a rapidly varying sequence of field patterns as a function of the input frequency. As the frequency of operation is scanned, different subsets of metamaterial elements become active, in turn varying the field patterns at the scene. Scene information can thus be indexed by frequency, with the overall effectiveness of the imaging scheme tied to the diversity of the generated field patterns. As the quality (Q-) factor of the metamaterial resonators increases, the number of distinct field patterns that can be generated increases - improving scene estimation. In this work we provide the foundation for computational imaging with metamaterial apertures based on frequency diversity, and establish that for resonators with physically relevant Q-factors, there are potentially enough distinct measurements of a typical scene within a reasonable bandwidth to achieve diffraction-limited reconstructions of physical scenes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1603-1612
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

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