Making and marking buddhist sacred space: Wuyue buddhism and its influence in the song dynasty (960-1279)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

According to legend, the famed Indian Buddhist monarch King Aśoka left an indelible record in China, stretching back to the Zhou dynasty. The potency of this legend blossomed much later in the region of Wuyue, one of the quasi-independent southern kingdoms during the so-called Five Dynasties (906–959) and Ten Kingdoms period. Inspired by the anxieties of displacement from and an admiration for India characteristic of a borderland complex, countered with translocations of Indian motifs, Hangzhou, the capital of Wuyue, developed a rich landscape of monasteries, temples, stūpas, etc., that transformed the region from Buddhist borderland to Buddhist center. This chapter examines the extent of the making and marking Buddhist sacred space in Wuyue, and its continued influence in defining the region as a Buddhist center, eventually manifesting in the Five Mountains and Ten Temples institutional framework in the Southern Song Dynasty (1127–1279).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Formation of Regional Religious Systems in Greater China
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages35-57
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781000568356
ISBN (Print)9781032103358
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • General Social Sciences

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