Lung toxicity of ambient particulate matter from southeastern U.S. sites with different contributing sources: Relationships between composition and effects

Jean Clare Seagrave, Jacob D. McDonald, Edward Bedrick, Eric S. Edgerton, Andrew P. Gigliotti, John J. Jansen, Lin Ke, Luke P. Naeher, Steven K. Seilkop, Mei Zheng, Joe L. Mauderly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

138 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Exposure to air pollution and, more specifically, particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. However, the specific PM characteristics responsible for biological effects have not been defined. Objectives: In this project we examined the composition, sources, and relative toxicity of samples of PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm(PM2.5) collected from sites within the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) air monitoring network during two seasons. These sites represent four areas with differing sources of PM2.5, including local urban versus regional sources, urban areas with different contributions of transportation and industrial sources, and a site influenced by Gulf of Mexico weather patterns. Methods: We collected samples from each site during the winter and summer of 2004 for toxicity testing and for chemical analysis and chemical mass balance-based source apportionment. We also collected PM2.5 downwind of a series of prescribed forest burns, We assessed the toxicity of the samples by instillation into rat lungs and assessed general toxicity, acute cytotoxicity, and inflammation. Statistical dose-response modeling techniques were used to rank the relative toxicity and compare the seasonal differences at each site. Projection-to-latent-surfaces (PLS) techniques examined the relationships among sources, chemical composition, and toxicologic end points. Results and conclusions: Urban sites with high contributions from vehicles and industry were most toxic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1387-1393
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume114
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chemical mass balance
  • In vivo
  • Intratracheal instillation
  • Lung
  • Particulate matter
  • PM
  • Projection to latent surfaces
  • Source apportionment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Lung toxicity of ambient particulate matter from southeastern U.S. sites with different contributing sources: Relationships between composition and effects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this