Isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-oceanography in Maroon Anemonefish (Amphiprion biaculeatus)

Kyra S. Fitz, Humberto R. Montes, Diane M. Thompson, Malin L. Pinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Obtaining dispersal estimates for a species is key to understanding local adaptation and population dynamics and to implementing conservation actions. Genetic isolation-by-distance (IBD) patterns can be used for estimating dispersal, and these patterns are especially useful for marine species in which few other methods are available. In this study, we genotyped coral reef fish (Amphiprion biaculeatus) at 16 microsatellite loci across eight sites across 210 km in the central Philippines to generate fine-scale estimates of dispersal. All sites except for one followed IBD patterns. Using IBD theory, we estimated a larval dispersal kernel spread of 8.9 km (95% confidence interval of 2.3–18.4 km). Genetic distance to the remaining site correlated strongly with the inverse probability of larval dispersal from an oceanographic model. Ocean currents were a better explanation for genetic distance at large spatial extents (sites greater than 150 km apart), while geographic distance remained the best explanation for spatial extents less than 150 km. Our study demonstrates the utility of combining IBD patterns with oceanographic simulations to understand connectivity in marine environments and to guide marine conservation strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-392
Number of pages14
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • clownfish
  • connectivity
  • dispersal
  • marine conservation
  • marine larvae
  • population genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • General Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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