Isolation between sympatric anadromous and resident threespine stickleback species in Mud Lake, Alaska

Anjali D. Karve, Frank A. Von Hippel, Michael A. Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

A sympatric pair of anadromous and resident freshwater threespine stickleback species (Gasterosteus aculeatus species complex) occurs in Mud Lake in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, Alaska. The two forms differ in an array of morphological traits, including traits associated with predator defense (e.g., spine lengths) and trophic ecology (e.g., number of gill rakers). Mud Lake is only the third lake reported to have anadromous stickleback (which have a complete row of lateral plates) coexisting with low-plated resident stickleback in the absence of intermediate partially plated fish. Microhabitat and seasonal isolation appear to contribute to reproductive isolation between the two forms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-296
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Biology of Fishes
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Nuptial coloration
  • Spatial isolation
  • Speciation
  • Species pair
  • Temporal isolation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

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