Intentions to Seek Information about E-Cigarettes: Perceived Risk, Efficacy, and Smoking Identity

Bo Yang, Shaohai Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While e-cigarette use increases in the US., people’s knowledge about e-cigarettes is limited. Information seeking may influence people’s knowledge about e-cigarettes. Using the risk perception attitude framework and the identity theory, this study examined if U.S. adult current smokers (n = 1,841) differing in perceived efficacy of switching completely to e-cigarettes, perceived risk of cigarette smoking, and smoking identity report different levels of intentions to seek information about e-cigarettes. Results revealed that smokers with high perceived risk of smoking and perceived efficacy about switching completely to e-cigarettes (responsive group) reported strongest intentions to seek information about e-cigarettes (M = 5.41 on a 1–7 scale), followed by the group having low smoking risk perceptions and high e-cigarette efficacy beliefs (proactive group; M = 4.58), the group having high smoking risk perceptions and low e-cigarette efficacy beliefs (avoidance group; M = 3.18), and the group low on both factors (indifference group; M = 2.76). The differences between responsive group and proactive, avoidance, and indifference groups were greater among smokers with high (M diff = 6.14) vs. low (M diff = 5.27) smoking identity. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-349
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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