Integrating health education and physical activity programming for cardiovascular health promotion among female inmates: A proof of concept study

Uma S. Nair, Jeremy S. Jordan, Daniel Funk, Kristin Gavin, Erica Tibbetts, Bradley N. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Female inmate populations in the United States tend to be overweight, physically inactive, experience high stress, and have a history of nicotine and other drug dependence. Thus, they bear an elevated risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease than the general population. However, few evidence-based health interventions exist for this population. This study will test proof of concept, feasibility, and potential efficacy of a multiple health behavior change intervention that integrates CV-health promotion education delivered during a physical activity (PA) program (indoor cycling) tailored to this population. This study uses a quasi-experimental 2-group design with two measurement time-points: baseline and 8-week end of treatment. N = 120 incarcerated women (18-59 years of age) who are medically cleared for participation in PA will be enrolled. Indoor cycling instructors will be trained to deliver five health education topics over an 8-week period during twice-weekly cycling classes. Topics match the American Heart Association recommendations for CV health: (a) nutrition, (b) PA promotion, (c) weight management, (d) stress management, and (e) smoking cessation and relapse prevention. Modes of intervention include instructor advice, written materials and audio/video clips reviewed during class. CV-related and mental health measures will be assessed at both time-points. Results will guide a full scale efficacy study. Future research in this area has potential to impact the health of female inmates, a high-risk population. Moreover, this multiple health behavior change intervention model represents a community approach to health promotion that could generalize to other underserved populations who may benefit most from similar intervention efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-69
Number of pages5
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume48
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular health
  • Multiple health behavior change
  • Physical activity
  • Underserved women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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