Insights into the behavior of certain optical systems gleaned from Feynman's approach to quantum electrodynamics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Richard Feynman's method of path integrals is based on the fundamental assumption that a system starting at a point A and arriving at a point B takes all possible paths from A to B, with each path contributing its own (complex) probability amplitude. The sum of the amplitudes over all these paths then yields the overall probability amplitude that the system starting at A would end up at B. We apply Feynman's method to several optical systems of practical interest and discuss the nuances of the method as well as instances where the predicted outcomes agree or disagree with those of classical optical theory. Examples include the properties of beam-splitters, passage of single photons through Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac interferometers, electric and magnetic dipole scattering, reciprocity, time-reversal symmetry, the optical theorem, the Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem, far field diffraction, and the two-photon interference phenomenon known as the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPlasmonics
Subtitle of host publicationDesign, Materials, Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications XX
EditorsDin Ping Tsai, Takuo Tanaka, Yu-Jung Lu
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781510653788
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
EventPlasmonics: Design, Materials, Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications XX 2022 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Aug 21 2022Aug 25 2022

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume12197
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Conference

ConferencePlasmonics: Design, Materials, Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications XX 2022
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period8/21/228/25/22

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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