Impact of Virginia's School-Entry Vaccine Mandate on Human Papillomavirus Vaccination among 13-17-Year-Old Females

Dudith Pierre-Victor, Timothy F. Page, Mary Jo Trepka, Dionne P. Stephens, Tan Li, Purnima Madhivanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The link between human papillomavirus (HPV) and anogenital cancers is well established in the literature. Many states have passed laws requiring funding for HPV education or vaccination. Mandatory HPV vaccination policies have been considered and passed in several states; yet their effectiveness has not been evaluated. This study sought to assess the impact of Virginia's HPV vaccine mandate for school-entry on HPV vaccine uptake among females aged 13-17 years. Methods: Data from the National Immunization Survey-Teen for the 2008-2012 period were used, and 3,203 adolescent females were included in the analysis. We performed difference-in-differences estimation and logistic regression with a policy and period interaction term. Virginia was considered the treatment state, and South Carolina and Tennessee were the comparison states to account for nonpolicy factors that may have affected vaccination rates during the time period considered in the analysis. Results: There was no evidence of an effect of Virginia's HPV vaccine mandate for school-entry on vaccination rates or on physician vaccination recommendation using either the difference-by-differences analysis or the policy and period interaction term in the logistic regression. Physician recommendation was the factor most strongly associated with vaccination in the Virginia-South Carolina analysis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 9.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.11-14.3) and in the Virginia-Tennessee analysis (aOR = 9.33; 95% CI: 6.11-14.3). Conclusion: Study findings suggest that Virginia's HPV vaccine mandate for school-entry did not lead to a significant increase in HPV vaccination among adolescent females or physician recommendations. However, physician recommendation was the factor most strongly associated with vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-275
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • effectiveness
  • human papillomavirus
  • mandate
  • school-entry
  • vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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