Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) Continues to Evolve in Presence of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies More than Ten Years after Infection

Antoine Chaillon, Martine Braibant, Stéphane Hué, Samia Bencharif, David Enard, Alain Moreau, Assia Samri, Henri Agut, Francis Barin

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The evolution of HIV-1 and its immune escape to autologous neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) during the acute/early phases of infection have been analyzed in depth in many studies. In contrast, little is known about neither the long-term evolution of the virus in patients who developed broadly Nabs (bNabs) or the mechanism of escape in presence of these bNabs. Results: We have studied the viral population infecting a long term non progressor HIV-1 infected patient who had developed broadly neutralizing antibodies toward all tier 2/3 viruses (6 clades) tested, 9 years after infection, and was then followed up over 7 years. The autologous neutralization titers of the sequential sera toward env variants representative of the viral population significantly increased during the follow-up period. The most resistant pseudotyped virus was identified at the last visit suggesting that it represented a late emerging escape variant. We identified 5 amino acids substitutions that appeared associated with escape to broadly neutralizing antibodies. They were V319I/S, R/K355T, R/W429G, Q460E and G/T463E, in V3, C3 and V5 regions. Conclusion: This study showed that HIV-1 may continue to evolve in presence of both broadly neutralizing antibodies and increasing autologous neutralizing activity more than 10 years post-infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere44163
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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