How Is Variety in Daily Life Related to the Expression of Personality States? An Ambulatory Assessment Study

Stefanie Lindner, Mirjam Stieger, Dominik Rüegger, Tobias Kowatsch, Christoph Flückiger, Matthias R. Mehl, Mathias Allemand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

People differ in the way they live their daily lives. For some people, daily life is characterized by multiple and diverse experiences, while others have more stability and routine in their lives. However, little is known about how variety in daily life relates to the expression of personality states. The present study examined within-person associations between variety in social partners, places, and activities with state expression. Data came from an ambulatory assessment study (N = 962, Mage = 25.49) with four assessments per day over a period of six consecutive days. The results of the multilevel modeling analyses suggest that variety in daily life is associated with some, but not all, state expressions. For instance, on days when participants experienced a greater variety in activities, they reported being less neurotic and conscientious, but also more agreeable. In addition, the links between all social partners, places, and activities with the expression of the state were examined simultaneously to obtain more detailed information on the multifaceted nature of situation-state expression links. We conclude that variety in daily life has both theoretical and empirical relevance for the expression of personality states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-188
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2024

Keywords

  • ambulatory assessment
  • daily life research
  • expression of personality states
  • variety in daily life
  • within-person variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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