How Do U.S. Colleges and Universities Help Students Address Basic Needs? A National Inventory of Resources for Food and Housing Insecurity

Katherine E. Speirs, Stephanie K. Grutzmacher, Ashley L. Munger, Timothy M. Ottusch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study documents the resources U.S. colleges and universities offer to address student food and housing insecurity and explores differences across community colleges, four-year public schools, and four-year private schools. Using a stratified random sample (n = 448) of U.S. postsecondary institutions, a systematic web search for evidence of 18 resources was conducted. A framework for classifying resources was developed. Logistic regression was used to explore differences by institution type. Eighty-eight percent of the schools in the sample offered at least one resource. On average, schools offered four resources. Food pantries were the most frequently offered resource, while providing information about low-cost campus dining options was the least frequently offered. Four-year private schools offered fewer resources than four-year public schools and community colleges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEducational Researcher
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • colleges
  • food insecurity
  • housing insecurity
  • policy
  • postsecondary education
  • regression analyses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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