Hispanic Male Recruitment into Obesity-Related Research: Evaluating Content Messaging Strategies, Experimental Findings, and Practical Implications

Luis A. Valdez, David O. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hispanic men have the highest prevalence of overweight and obesity among men in the U.S. Current research is lacking to inform best practices to engage Hispanic men in obesity-related research. The purpose of this work was to evaluate messaging strategies to engage Hispanic men in obesity-related research. Outreach took place in an outdoor marketplace in Southern Arizona, US. Messaging strategies (fear appeal/arousal, positive masculinity, and spousal convergence) identified in formative research were utilized. Two six-foot standing banners displayed content messages and infographics in both English and Spanish. Trained bilingual and bicultural staff collected health information survey cards that elicited self-reported demographic information and health concerns. Four aspects of recruitment were evaluated: volume, efficiency, community representation, and primary health concerns. A comparative analysis was conducted in the fall of 2016 to determine the effectiveness of each messaging strategy. 387 survey cards were collected, 221 were from Hispanic men. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer were identified as the most pertinent health concerns. Fear appeal yielded 209 completed surveys, followed by 110 for positive masculinity, and 68 for spousal convergence. Fear appeal/arousal and positive masculinity content messaging were effective approaches to engage Hispanic males in research, preventive and treatment efforts. Findings warrant replication as there is potential for confounding seasonal effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-93
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Quarterly of Community Health Education
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • communication strategies
  • community-based
  • men’s health
  • recruitment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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