High resolution multi-arterial phase MRI improves lesion contrast in chronic liver disease

Sharon E. Clarke, Manojkumar Saranathan, Dan W. Rettmann, Brian A. Hargreaves, Shreyas S. Vasanawala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the reliability of arterial phase capture and evaluate hypervascular lesion contrast kinetics with a combined view-sharing and parallel imaging dynamic contrast-enhanced acquisition, DIfferential Sub-sampling with Cartesian Ordering (DISCO), in patients with known chronic liver disease. Methods: A retrospective review of 3T MR images from 26 patients with known chronic liver disease referred for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance or post-treatment follow up was performed. After administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent, a multiphasic acquisition was obtained in a 28 s breath-hold, from which seven sequential post-contrast image volumes were reconstructed. Results: The late arterial phase was successfully captured in all cases (26/26, 95% CI 87-100%). Images obtained 26 s post-injection had the highest frequency of late arterial phase capture (20/26) and lesion detection (23/26) of any individual post-contrast time; however, the multiphasic data resulted in a significantly higher frequency of late arterial phase capture (26/26, p=0.03) and a higher relative contrast (5.37+/-0.97 versus 7.10+/-0.98, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Multiphasic acquisition with combined view-sharing and parallel imaging reliably captures the late arterial phase and provides sufficient temporal resolution to characterize hepatic lesion contrast kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease while maintaining high spatial resolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E90-E99
JournalClinical and Investigative Medicine
Volume38
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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