Health Promotion Among Mexican-Origin Survivors of Breast Cancer and Caregivers Living in the United States-Mexico Border Region: Qualitative Analysis From the Vida Plena Study

Meghan B. Skiba, Melissa Lopez-Pentecost, Samantha J. Werts, Maia Ingram, Rosi M. Vogel, Tatiana Enriquez, Lizzie Garcia, Cynthia A. Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Hispanic survivors of cancer experience increased cancer burden. Lifestyle behaviors, including diet and physical activity, may reduce the cancer burden. There is limited knowledge about the posttreatment lifestyle experiences of Hispanic survivors of cancer living on the United States-Mexico border. Objective: This study aims to support the development of a stakeholder-informed, culturally relevant, evidence-based lifestyle intervention for Mexican-origin Hispanic survivors of cancer living in a border community to improve their dietary quality and physical activity. Methods: Semistructured interviews with 12 Mexican-origin Hispanic survivors of breast cancer and 7 caregivers were conducted through internet-based teleconferencing. The interviews explored the impact of cancer on lifestyle and treatment-related symptoms, perception of lifestyle as an influence on health after cancer, and intervention content and delivery preferences. Interviews were analyzed using a deductive thematic approach grounded in the Quality of Cancer Survivorship Care Framework. Results: Key survivor themes included perception of Mexican diet as unhealthy, need for reliable diet-related information, perceived benefits of physical activity after cancer treatment, family support for healthy lifestyles (physical and emotional), presence of cancer-related symptoms interfering with lifestyle, and financial barriers to living a healthy lifestyle. Among caregivers, key themes included effects of the cancer caregiving experience on caregivers' lifestyle and cancer-preventive behaviors and gratification in providing support to the survivors. Conclusions: The interviews revealed key considerations to the adaptation, development, and implementation of a theory-informed, evidence-based, culturally relevant lifestyle program to support lifestyle behavior change among Mexican-origin Hispanic survivors of cancer living in border communities. Our qualitative findings highlight specific strategies that can be implemented in health promotion programming aimed at encouraging cancer protective behaviors to reduce the burden of cancer and comorbidities in Mexican-origin survivors of cancer living in border communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere33083
JournalJMIR Cancer
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

Keywords

  • Mexican-origin Hispanics
  • border health
  • breast cancer
  • caregivers
  • diet
  • health promotion
  • lifestyle
  • mobile phone
  • physical activity
  • survivorship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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