Feasibility, Acceptability, and Preliminary Effectiveness of a Compassion-Centered Team Intervention to Improve Clinical Research Coordinator Resilience and Well-Being

Jennifer S. Mascaro, Patricia K. Palmer, Marcia J. Ash, Caroline Peacock, Anuja Sharma, Cam Escoffery, Charles Raison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: Oncology clinical research coordinators (CRCs) and team-based coordinator care are critical for the success of clinical trials. However, CRCs typically report elevated anxiety and burnout and many oncology centers have high levels of coordinator attrition. To address the need for a team-based intervention to reduce burnout and promote resilience and cohesion among CRCs, we developed a compassion-centered, team-based intervention, Compassion-Centered Spiritual Health Team Intervention (CCSH-TI). METHODS: Participants were CRCs working in disease-specific teams within a comprehensive cancer center. CRCs were randomly assigned by team to either participate in four 60-minute sessions of CCSH-TI or receive the intervention after the study. To evaluate whether CCSH-TI is feasible and acceptable, we used a mixed-method approach including self-report questionnaires and a focus group. To evaluate the impact of CCSH-TI, we assessed self-reported resilience, well-being, burnout, and team civility before and immediately after the intervention period (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04060901). RESULTS: Attendance varied by team, but all teams had rates more than 60%. Coordinators rated high levels of credibility of CCSH-TI to improve burnout, and the majority reported that they received benefits, particularly in resilience and stress management, indicating acceptability. Coordinators randomly assigned to CCSH-TI reported an increase in resilience compared with coordinators randomly assigned to the wait-list group (F(41) = 4.53, P = .039). CONCLUSION: Data from this pilot study indicate that CCSH-TI may be a feasible, credible, acceptable, and effective intervention to augment individual resilience among CRCs. However, the quantitative and qualitative data suggest that more comprehensive and systematic programming is necessary to truly mitigate burnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e936-e946
JournalJCO Oncology Practice
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Health Policy
  • Oncology(nursing)

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