Factors That Prevent Equitable Access to Rehabilitation for Aboriginal Australians with Disabilities: The Need for Culturally Safe Rehabilitation

Elizabeth Kendall, Catherine A. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the barriers that prevent Aboriginal people with disabilities from accessing rehabilitation services. Study Design: Qualitative study with assistance from a local community research partner. Setting: A predominately Aboriginal town in Australia. Participants: Sixteen service providers from the local town, 8 from the nearest regional town, and 4 local people with disabilities. Main Outcome Measures: Data were categorized into themes that represented barriers to appropriate rehabilitation. Results: Six major themes were identified, including aspects of Aboriginal culture that influenced the ability of Aboriginal people with disabilities to access services and cultural stereotypes on the part of non-Aboriginal service providers. Conclusions: Significant obstacles to appropriate service provision exist in Australia. Models of culturally safe rehabilitation must be embraced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-13
Number of pages9
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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