Factors associated with baseline smoking selfefficacy among male Qatari residents enrolled in a quit smoking study

Mohammed Al Thani, Vasiliki Leventakou, Angeliki Sofroniou, Hamza I. Butt, Iman A. Hakim, Cynthia Thomson, Uma S. Nair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Smoking self-efficacy, described as confidence in one's ability to abstain from smoking in high-risk situations is a key predictor in cessation outcomes; however, there is a dearth of research on factors that influence self-efficacy surrounding smoking behavior. This study examines factors associated with baseline self-efficacy among treatment seeking participants enrolled in a pilot feasibility smoking cessation study. Participants (n = 247) were daily male smokers, residents of Doha in Qatar (18-60 years) who were enrolled in a telephonebased smoking cessation study. Baseline assessments included self-efficacy, home smoking rules, socio-demographic variables, smoking history, and psychosocial characteristics. Factors associated with self-efficacy were assessed using multiple linear regression analysis. Results showed that after controlling for relevant variables, number of cigarettes smoked (β = -0.22; 95% CI: -0.37, -0.06), having at least one quit attempt in the past year (β = 2.30; 95% CI: 0.27, 4.35), and reporting a complete home smoking ban (β = 3.13; 95% CI: 0.56, 5.70) were significantly associated with higher self-efficacy to quit smoking. These results provide data-driven indication of several key variables that can be targeted to increase smoking self-efficacy in this understudied population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0263306
JournalPloS one
Volume17
Issue number1 January
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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