Effects of Perceived Discrimination on Depressive Symptoms Among Black Men Residing in the United States: A Meta-Analysis

Angelitta M. Britt-Spells, Maribeth Slebodnik, Laura P. Sands, David Rollock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research reports that perceived discrimination is positively associated with depressive symptoms. The literature is limited when examining this relationship among Black men. This meta-analysis systematically examines the current literature and investigates the relationship of perceived discrimination on depressive symptoms among Black men residing in the United States. Using a random-effects model, study findings indicate a positive association between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms among Black men (r =.29). Several potential moderators were also examined in this study; however, there were no significant moderation effects detected. Recommendations and implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-63
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican journal of men's health
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • African American
  • depression
  • discrimination
  • mental health
  • meta-analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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