Effect of stress on the dissolution/crystallization of apatite in aqueous solution: A thermochemical equilibrium study

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3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bone mineralization is critical to maintaining tissue mechanical function. The application of mechanical stress via exercise promotes bone mineralization via cellular mechanotransduction and increased fluid transport through the collagen matrix. However, due to its complex composition and ability to exchange ions with the surrounding body fluids, bone mineral composition and crystallization is also expected to respond to stress. Here, a combination of data from materials simulations, namely density functional theory and molecular dynamics, and experimental studies were input into an equilibrium thermodynamic model of bone apatite under stress in an aqueous solution based on the theory of thermochemical equilibrium of stressed solids. The model indicated that increasing uniaxial stress induced mineral crystallization. This was accompanied by a decrease in calcium and carbonate integration into the apatite solid. These results suggest that weight-bearing exercises can increase tissue mineralization via interactions between bone mineral and body fluid independent of cell and matrix behaviours, thus providing another mechanism by which exercise can improve bone health. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Supercomputing simulations of advanced materials'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number20220242
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume381
Issue number2250
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 2023

Keywords

  • bone mineralization
  • modelling and simulation
  • thermodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Mathematics
  • General Engineering
  • General Physics and Astronomy

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